Easy Bluegrass Guitar Solo #1 - Freeborn Man!

Updated: Oct 27



Greetings! :)

If you are like me, you could use a 'simple and easy' approach to enjoy playing bluegrass guitar without being required to play at lightning fast speed. Well, here (in the video above) is a 'great fun to play' bluegrass guitar solo that can be used to play on Freeborn Man without having to be a Bluegrass master!


Five Great Ways To Learn From This Solo!

1) Slow this video down on Youtube and learn one or all of the licks!


2) Read more about this solo (see below) under 'Theory, Concepts and Analysis' and then use what you learn to create your own licks and/or complete solo while using 'Easy Bluegrass Guitar Solo #1' as a guide!


3) You and I can certainly work together in a lesson format, online or in-person, to simply make this 'solo, its theory and its concepts' as quick-and-easy as possible to learn and digest (guitar tab included)!


4) You are welcome to 'Zelle' me $5.50 USD and I will be happy to send to you a PDF File of the Guitar Tab which also includes standard notation and markings for the finger strategy that I used in the video.


5) Join one of our weekly small-group, online sessions where we learn 'guitar licks' while also leaning important lessons about rhythm, theory, improvisation, and more. Then you can use what you are learning in class to help you create licks and solos just as I have done in the 'Easy Bluegrass Guitar Solo #1' video above!





Theory, Concepts and Analysis!

- Notice how, essentially, this solo breaks down into 'six four-bar phrases'. Learn to hear and create music 'four measures at a time' in order to enjoy a much more 'organized and productive' foundation for composing, performing and improvising.


- This composition uses the following chord progression. Notice that there are 'six four-bar sections':

/G/G/G/G/

/G/G/G/G/

/C/C/C/C/

/G/G/G/G/

/D/D/D/D/

/G/G/G/G/


- Over the first and second G chord section, I used the following tones:

/1,2,b3,3,4,5, and 6/ [description relates to the G root]


- Over the C chord I used the following tones:

/2,b3,3,5,6, and b7/ [description relates to the C root]


- Over the third G chord section, I used the following tones:

/1,b3,3,4,5,6, and b7/ [description relates to the G root]


- Over the D chord I used the following tones:

/1,2,b3,11,5,#5, and b7/ [description relates to the D root]


- And, Over the fourth G chord section, I used the following tones:

/1,2,b3,3, and 6/ [description relates to the G root]


If some, or all, of what you have just reviewed under 'Theory, Concepts and Analysis' seems confusing, fret not! It is certainly possible to be a great player, even without fully understanding the theoretical knowledge written above, since there are many different ways to learn and achieve musical success. So, as you continue to grow forward on your own personal adventure, feel free to let me know if you would like for you us to do some lessons along the way!


Either way, and until next time, here's wishing you all the best!


Nate


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